Jump to content
LOTROCommunity

Sport. Love it or loathe it?


Moderate Peril
 Share

Recommended Posts

I don't care for sport.

 

That possibly marginalises me in certain social circles and situations (I'll move on to that point later).

 

Let me qualify my position. I have no hatred of sport or sporting endeavours. I totally "get" why other people do like it. I simply have no interest in it and don't imbue it with a lot of the virtues and merits that some people do.

 

I most certainly do dislike some of the culture that is associated with sport. There is elitism, sexism, racism, and pretty much any other "ism" that's going. I am aware that not everyone involed with sport fall in to that category but not just a fringe element.

 

Let me be very candid about one thing. Something that a lot of people won't admit to. I don't enjoy losing. I also don't care for some of the accepted aspects of team dynamics. IE Team failure over individual failure. I remember as a child being castigated by a PE teacher because the team that I was on had lost a game. It annoyed me no end that we were bollocked as a group when the blame lay with two very specific individuals.

 

So, why have I arrived at being a non sports person, when so many people do the opposite? Well I guess it has a lot to do with ones personal upbringing. My Dad was an academic with no interest in sport, so it was never a major feature of home life. Thus it never had a particular hold over me. With my own son, his God Father filled the gap in this area, taking him to football matches and the like.

 

Now my upbringing did not lead me to being averse to participating in sporting activities at school. Quite the opposite. I use to try pretty much everything with an open mind. However, my motivation was often different to others. I did things for their own inherent fun and was not really interested in the prevailing culture of competitiveness. This changed when I was picked to be on the school football team (in the UK sense of the word) roundabout the age of eleven.  the incident went something like as follows:

 

PE Teacher: Why didn't you come to football practise on Saturday morning?

Me: I didn't want to miss Swap Shop (for US folk, insert some other Saturday TV morning waste of time :) )

Pe Teacher: It's not about what you want but what the school wants...

 

This resulted in the PE teacher taking it up with my Dad. He was surprised when my Dad pointed out what I did with my own time was my concern and none of his. I spent the next few years on his shit list as a result. But then again PE teachers in the 1970's were notorious cunts.

 

So here I am now at the age of Fortysomething and there is a an entire aspect of UK culture that passes me by. Don't get me wrong I can happily watch any major sporting event on TV and can understand it and go along with it for the sake of courtesy. I just really couldn't give a shit about it.

 

However as I mentioned earlier, sport is a major ice breaker and way to make casual conversation in the UK. If you aren't in to it then a lot of TV programming, social events and general culture will be kept separate from you if you choose for it to. It doesn't happen so much now, or at least not so much in the circles I move in, but if you don't like sports you are often met with suspicion from certain quarters. Some consider it to be a indicator of your sexuality or politics for some reasons ;)

 

Venerating an individual or a teams dedication to excel at something is laudable to a degree. However, I don't really understand the tribal nature of certain sports communities nor the need to vicariously live through others achievements. Plus there is the far more practical problem associated with sportsmen/women, fans and even commentators. For every good one there is always another who is wanting. For all the good that sporting endeavours do there is also a negative effect often linked to the financial imperatives of the business.

 

Human beings are competitive and naturally sports feeds in to that. Where does fostering that notion change from being a practical lesson about life to a something more unwholesome?

 

So, who else is oblivious to the merits of sport and who thinks they are a defining quality of human beings?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use to be a huge sports fan, but I just became more and more disgusted with what athletes get away with just because they are good at a kids game. I also resent my tax dollars being given to billionaires so they can have the community build them a sports arena that the public can't use without paying to do so. Pro sports, IMO, is just as much an opiate of the masses as religion is. It just distracts the populace from more important aspects of life, much the way gladiatorial combat did in ancient Rome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Football, Ice Hockey, Cricket, Rugby League, Gridiron, Golf when it's the Ryder Cup(yeah, screw you, you americans, WE ARE EUROPE! ;)).

I loved playing sports when I was younger and in a healthier state of body.

Sadly, my knees and ankles have taken a beating over the years, and now I'm unable to do any of the sports that I really loved playing when I grew up.

Floorball and Football was my main poisons, and if you knew Floorball, you know that it's an indoor sport that is VERY high impact, lots of speedy running, lots of quick stops and turns. Fun as anything though.

Mostly, a Nordic sport, with some central/eastern European nations emerging as contenders atm, but to date all World Champs have been won by either Sweden(yay) or Finland(boooh).

I played Football from age 7 until age 21 where my knees stopped allowing me to partake in pre-season training.

 

For me, growing up, I would rather train than do homework, lol!


I have a real problem with American sports, but I freely admit it is probably caused by the so-called TV coverage (talking heads I don't need).

Religiously watching Tour de France.

 

Talking about a previously "dirty" sport.

Cycling has a looooong way to go to get back to where it was deemed before all the Cheaters were hung out to dry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I played a lot of sports growing up, and enjoy watching and followings sports today.  I mostly played team sports: soccer, basketball, (American) football, and volleyball, but also dabbled in some individual sports as well (namely tennis and golf).  Football and volleyball were the only two I ever played at an organized level beyond high school though (read as: in college or on regional teams).

 

Like you, I see negative things about sports.  You mentioned it fostering notions of elitism, which I don't see as inherently wrong - after all, why shouldn't the best and brightest be venerated in some fashion - but here that adulation sometimes gets twisted into bad results: the most noticeable example being when a prominent athlete gets accused of sexually assaulting or raping a woman.  Sometimes it's more than one athlete from the same team (a gang rape accusation).  If the accused is a start athlete, the tendency for some is to find reasons to blame the victim, because in the eyes of many she is worthless compared to the glory that our local Supercool High School football brings the community.  That sort of stuff is maddening - there are certainly false accusations made, and those can be very damaging in their own right - but to see people defend the accused not out of a sense of "innocent until proven guilty" (which I absolutely support) but because he's the star quarterback is just wrong.

 

Also, in the U.S., our two major college sports - American football and men's basketball - are highly exploitative.  Wealthy, mostly white men (television executives, corporate sponsors, bowl organizers, etc.) profit greatly from the free labor provided to them by the athletes.  Yes, most of the young men are on scholarship, which isn't anything to sneeze at, but graduation rates at nearly every major college are worse for the members of high profile sports than they are for the university populace as a whole, and almost no one cares - not even the universities, because as long as they get to enjoy their $70 million athletic budgets, they really don't care if LaMarcus Jones gets a degree or what happens to him after he blows out his knee in a game.

 

At the professional level, our most popular professional league - the NFL - has spent years denying that a sport full of large men slamming into each other at top speed over and over again can actually have a negative effect on the participants' health.  The league, until recently settling a lawsuit (which included the usual "admits no wrongdoing" language), refused to share even the least bit of extra cash from its booming coffers with its ex-players.  Many players do draw a pension, of course, but their pensions were largely based on their salaries, and a lot of ex-players played when the highest salary was less than the league-mandated mininum is now.

 

As a fan, it can sometimes be hard to justify my enjoyment of sports.  At times, I wonder if I'm no better than a Roman citizen watching some poor sap get torn apart by lions or a plantation owner laughing while he orders a couple of his slaves to fight to the death.

 

All that said...

 

As a participant, I don't think I can properly explain how valuable I think (team) sports are or can be.  Although I despise the tendency of some coaches to speak in war metaphors - perhaps that's just an American football phenomenon - the value of learning to be part of a team cannot be overstated.

 

One learns to sublimate one's ego for the betterment of those around him.  I was a pretty good hitter out of the middle blocker position in volleyball, but none of the teams I was on would have done nearly as well if I demanded that every set come my way.  Sometimes, just being a decoy and letting others have the glory was what helped the team win.  Even if you're not a star player, there's value in learning that your needs and wants are not always primary, and in fact quite often shouldn't be if there is a larger goal to be achieved by many (be that a league championship, winning a game, or simply executing a single play properly).

 

You have to learn to work with people who you may not like personally.  Have a personality conflict with another guy on the team, or maybe even hate him?  Who cares - keep that shit off the field, because it's not important.  On the field (court, rink, whatever), the only thing that matters is that everyone works together to make the team as successful as it can possibly be.

 

Those lessons apply in real life.  Most of us end up in jobs where we have to work with other people.  Wouldn't you rather work with people who are used to working with others and overcoming differences to achieve a common goal than with people who have learned that the only thing that matters is what they want for themselves?

 

Heck, look at the subject of these forums: an MMO.  I know some of you have raided or do raid - the same team concepts apply there.  Anyone who is more focused on measuring his DPS or sending tells about the hunter in the raid he doesn't like is a detriment to the raid group - the group would be better off with someone less talented but more team-oriented.

 

Regarding one of the examples you mentioned, Moderate Peril: the coach who lambasted the team for losing.  Although he went about it the wrong way, his point should have been that you all needed to learn what you could do better as a team to win the next time.  It helps no one for any of you to point a finger and say, "it's all those two guys' fault".  Those guys aren't going to want to work with you to get better if you do that, and may lose interest entirely in improving themselves.  Instead, it gives those of you who are more skilled an opportunity to take those guys aside and give them pointers, maybe spend some extra practice time with them outside of the normal practice to help them.  If they refuse the help, then they're the problem.  If they're willing to accept help but the rest of you just want to point fingers before even trying to help them, then the fault lies with the rest of you.

 

As for your choosing to watch a television program instead of attend football practice... if you accepted a spot on the team, you should have either shown up to practice or declined the spot.  Accepting the spot and then just not showing up because you don't feel like it is unacceptable in team sports.  Your time is your own, of course, and other things more important will come up (family emergencies, academics), but to casually decide not to go just because you want to watch some telly?  That's irresponsible bullshit.  I know you were a kid at the time, so you can be excused somewhat, but that's where one or both of your parents should have stepped in and maybe given you a different message.  Would your father have said the same thing to a teacher if you'd told a teacher you decided not to show up for class or do your homework because you wanted to catch a movie?  Or for choir practice?  Was the same excuse acceptable if you broke an obligation to your father?  "Dad, I know I said I'd clean my room today, but I felt like playing instead; remember, you said my time is my own to do with as I please..."

 

(I apologize for probably coming across like I'm ranting at you; perhaps I am, although that's not my intent.  I could be misreading the situation, but my suspicion is that your father was so cavalier about your obligation to the football team simply because it was sport and not something - in his eyes - worthy of proper concern.  At the very least, I hope I made clear that my issue is with the lack of care for your team and teammates, and not borne out of some "you should listen to your coach because he's your coach" ethos.)

 

Anyway, my wall of text is long enough as it is.  Sorry all. :)

 

tl;dr - There are terrible things about sports culture, but I think team sports can teach us valuable lessons if we participate in them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hate sports and find most of it pointless, dangerous and bad for your health. I know far too many people who ruined their health with all kinds of oh so healthy sports activities.

 

What created an addiction for me far stronger than any MMO is martial arts and the medical application of gymnastics / Qi Gong. To learn how to directly tranform the flow of thoughts to movement and to be completely awake in the present moment is only comparable to the rare instances when you perform music and reach the state of flow where you don't have to worry about expression and technical ability anymore.

 

Sports, no thanks. Body and mind improving physical activity, can't live without!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I detest sports for a number of reasons...but mostly because of my experiences with its fanbase.  They tend to be loud, arrogant, boorish, and often dumber than the proverbial sack of hammers.  I realize not all sports fans are like that but just like the stereotypical gamer over 40 who lives in his parents' basement...the bad ones are giving the good ones a bad rap.

 

Also, the amount of hype around sports irks me to no end.  When I turn on the news, I want to hear NEWS.  NOT who won the goddamn Super Bowl.

 

OK, I'm done.

 

;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding one of the examples you mentioned, Moderate Peril: the coach who lambasted the team for losing.  Although he went about it the wrong way, his point should have been that you all needed to learn what you could do better as a team to win the next time.  It helps no one for any of you to point a finger and say, "it's all those two guys' fault".  

 

As for your choosing to watch a television program instead of attend football practice... if you accepted a spot on the team, you should have either shown up to practice or declined the spot.  Accepting the spot and then just not showing up because you don't feel like it is unacceptable in team sports.  

 

Sorry, I don't buy the take one for the team concept. I deal in processes. Identify the point of failure and remedy it. Those who did not pull their weight could either up their game or be replaced. Why should I be inconvenienced?

 

As you may have guessed I'm not a big team player. Unless I have some personal say over the team IE Populate it with those I know, trust and rely on.

 

It's also one of the reasons I left a successful career in IT and have gone self employed. The entire "having to work with people" is a separate discussion in itself, which I may reserve for another time. Let it suffice to say that work colleagues are complete strangers  that you know absolutely nothing about. Many of them you would never cultivate as friends under any circumstances, yet through a caprice of fate you have to interact with them on a daily basis. All I'll say for now is I amazed there is not a higher murder rate in the work environment.

 

As for my personal anecdote, I did say I was "picked" for the school team. IE this was not an voluntary act. It something thrust upon me and although it was not mandatory, there was a prevailing culture in the 1970's that you didn't say no. I did. Furthermore it was made to illustrate how a simple and enjoyable activity as playing football at school, was subsequently usurped into something else. Namely the pandering to the vanities and of some sport teachers and a schools crass notions of success and competition. It robbed the sport of any fun.

 

Oh and the same thing can be applied to music lessons and playing an instrument. One minute you're having fun blowing away on a Bassoon. Next thing you know some failed musician is giving you shit for not winning the regional inter-school championships and bolstering their ego. (Please note that this is an example and not a personal revelation).

 

I'm sure there are good coaches out there who are worthy, honest and genuine mentors. I'll also still believe that there are positive things that come from sports. However, I seen precious little of them in my life time. Those sort of "sensei" type coaches seem mainly to exist in fiction. If you have experienced such people then that is a good thing. 

 

As for what I have learned about team dynamics, I think the key thing is to make sure you only deal with a team that you have some tangible say in picking and running.

 

Oh and I'm not a number, I am a free man :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What are you considering a sport? Seems like you have painted all sports with a pretty broad brush, when there are plenty that don't fit your criticisms. Just because something is not sanctioned by the money grab called "education" doesn't mean it isn't a sport.

 

"I most certainly do dislike some of the culture that is associated with sport. There is elitism, sexism, racism, and pretty much any other "ism" that's going."

 

Aside from bravado, which is something I don't believe can be separated easily, and the occasional asshole that lives in any venue, I've never encountered the negative vibes you are describing in any sport I've been involved in. I was on the rifle team and color guard drill team in high school, and since then have spent considerable time bracket racing, class racing, IHMSA and IDPA competition, dabbled in other shooting and driving sports, and then there are the pastimes like darts, bowling, golf, hunting, fishing, probably a lot more that I could come up with. Some I liked, some I didn't, some just lost my interest.

 

Maybe the idea of sport is different in the UK.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps there is some confusion here between the "merits of sports" and what I would call "the evil of the sports industry."  I think there is plenty of value in teaching kids to enjoy sports for the sake of learning teamwork, learning both how to LOSE as well as how to win, and all that sort of jazz.  It is also nice to see people come together over "their team" and enjoy some comeraderie.

 

The huge multi-billion dollar machine that is the sporting industry however gets on my nerves big time. Not really sure one can escape it other than to not support it and not get sucked in by it.  For me that was fairly difficult in Spain, since soccer ( or better said "futbol") was indeed sacred and still is, just like in the UK and most other EU contries.  In the US however it isn't really even noticed in comparison to NFL, NBA, or MLB. 

 

Either way, as I don't have TV or hang around the water cooler, or in bars, it is pretty easy not to even know it is going on until play-offs madness hits most people who do follow their teams.   I do kinda like some aspects of watching olympic compettions,  but I tend to keep the sound off as the inccessant "story telling" of the comentators get on my nerves as well.

 

I guess mostly, I prefer to play rather than watch or talk about sports.  I have been on my share of adult soccer leagues, play some tennis now and again, and love to go hiking and kyaking, though I am not sure how much of a "sport" people consider the later.

 

Who exactly are these people though, that find you "suspect" for not being down with sports?  If birds of a feather and all that is true, perhaps you should look for a new place to roost ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love watching sport.  Watching the ashes on my second screen as I type this.  Have to admit that not many of my other nerdy friends enjoy it.  That being said I was never particularly good at 'playing' sport though.  I fit the standard nerd stereotype in that respect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sport has played a very big part in my life as a (white)South African and the reintegration after apartheid.
Sharing the sports field with people of other races is/was a privilege, and greatly promoted tolerance, camaraderie and respect.

I do not particularly care much for the 'super' professional sports such as football(and yes, also others!) these days however.
They have become overly commercialised and are not a true representation of what playing sport is all about.

Below is a clip of my favourite sport ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like certain sports, although I didn't really play any organized sports as a kid. American Football, primarily, being a fan of the Los Angelas Rams (temporarily exiled to St. Louis, but that will be rectified) and the University of Oregon Ducks. But that said, being a fan of a couple of teams doesn't really qualify me to be a Sports fan, per se'. While I'll watch NFL football and some college games (if they are decent teams), once Football shuts down for the rest of the year, I couldn't care less about any other sport.

 

Tried getting into Basketball for a while. Boring.

Hockey? Meh.

Golf? Umm, no.

Tennis? Lame.

Baseball? Worst. Sport. Ever.

 

Know what I enjoy watching in the Olympics? Two things: Bobsled and Curling. Bobsledding because it is fast and incredibly dangerous (NASCAR without the hicks), and Curling is just... hypnotic to watch. I can't turn away. It's like shuffleboard on ice with a big ass rock, propelled by brooms because why the hell not? How can you not like Curling?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I enjoy watching sports, I actively support a football team and am very much looking forward to next years world cup. I watch a lot of different sport, tennis, golf, F1, rugby, football, I even watched some really random crap at the last Olympics.

 

However... I smoke too much, drink too much and sit on my arse too much and about the most energetic sport I participate in would be an occasional game of snooker or pool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haha, that was brilliant. The "we" thing is something I've always found highly annoying regarding sports. Though it creeps into other things as well. My boyfriend watches a lot of Magic The Gathering streams and also streams himself and ALL of them use "we".. even the one person playing the game. I poke fun at him a lot regarding this. :P

I personally don't pay attention to sports. I used to watch some (American) football when I was a teenager.. and I'm not sure why. :P I didn't play any sports in school either aside from one year in basketball as I was in music. I was fine with the physical aspect as that was fun enough, but didn't like the aggression you could get from others (some mean girls in basketball I tell you!! :P) My family didn't pay attention to sports either.

I don't have any issues with it aside from the stupid fans and the exorbitant amounts of money players and coaches get. It's ridiculous how teachers and other incredibly essential professions are sorely underpaid and atheletes are completely spoiled.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Football... What's there not to love? Teaches languages as well...

 



How I learned English.

While in the center of culture and civilization that a French High School is, I was forced twice a week to attend  lessons in a guttural, primitive language, good enough for shop-keeping.
To make matters worse, my first teacher had a limp wrist, Saville-like yellow hair, wore pink shirts and liked me.
I hated him back, and the language suffered as a result.
The next teacher was much more to my liking – a tough, no nonsense working class hero. He despised me for being an effeminate intellectual, and the language suffered as a result.
Then one day, he turned up for our school football team training practice before our match with the English.
Obviously a spy, he wore a strikingly all-white outfit, and took up the position of center forward for the opposing team. I was goal-keeper.
A through ball was played, with my defenders caught napping. I sprinted out of the penalty area, no way was I going to allow this white-dressed clown to get to the ball first.

I got the ball with a two footed tackle, milliseconds before getting his feet. The ball went to one of my lazy defenders, but by then I could not take my eyes off a weird sight. With limbs flailing, the spy took to the air like some strange white swan, flew over me (I was still sliding forward) and landed with a heavy thud in the mud two or three meters behind me. “So much for your white dress, fancy guy” I thought, and came back to check on him. He was getting up groggily. “I’m sorry” I lied. “No, it’s all right, hard but fair” was his reply and in his rather dazed eyes I saw surprise and grudging respect.

My English marks sky-rocketed. I started to progress and now you have to read my stories and listen to my songs...

 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hate watching sport. People who enjoy it baffle me. To me, it's just the accepted version of porn, without the good bits of porn. People watching other people do something that should be fun. Even worse is that 'tribes' develop because of it. I have a friend who legitimately hates a person the minute he finds out they support a rival team. It's fucking retarded. He could be getting on great with them but the minute he finds out that they arbitrarily follow another group of unconnected, overpayed people than his particular team (a team that has none of the members he originally followed them for) he will just abandon them.

I dislike actually playing most sports. Only when it's sport without rules do I find it entertaining. Football with friends is a snorefest but a kickabout with some drinks is fun. Boxing is tedious with rules but charging your mate at top speed wearing boxing gloves is hilarious. Rugby is just timeconsuming with rules but taking out your friends, regardless of where the ball is, is brilliant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even worse is that 'tribes' develop because of it. I have a friend who legitimately hates a person the minute he finds out they support a rival team. It's fucking retarded. He could be getting on great with them but the minute he finds out that they arbitrarily follow another group of unconnected, overpayed people than his particular team (a team that has none of the members he originally followed them for) he will just abandon them.

 

This is a spot on example of the associated culture that seems to so often go hand in glove with sport.

 

I've worked with people who have come in to work on a Monday, genuinely demoralised, sad or angry over the failure of "their" team to succeed over the weekend. Also had work colleagues spoil a works outing by falling out over some inter-team dispute.

 

Perhaps sport should be added to list of subjects best avoided in social situations such as politics and religion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

As for my personal anecdote, I did say I was "picked" for the school team. IE this was not an voluntary act. It something thrust upon me and although it was not mandatory, there was a prevailing culture in the 1970's that you didn't say no. I did. Furthermore it was made to illustrate how a simple and enjoyable activity as playing football at school, was subsequently usurped into something else. Namely the pandering to the vanities and of some sport teachers and a schools crass notions of success and competition. It robbed the sport of any fun.

 

In that case, I apologize.  The concept of being picked for a team that you didn't try out for is bizarre to me.  I've heard of coaches tracking down kids and asking them to join a team, but had never heard of a coach just adding a kid to a team without consulting the kid and subsequently expecting the kid to show up for practice.  That's just weird.

 

So again, I'm sorry for the rant; I clearly misunderstood the situation.

 

As for being a team player, I'm with you on that.  In sports I never minded the whole "we're only as strong as the weakest link" mentality, but I always hated having to work with others for academic projects.  I preferred to do my own without having the potentially crappy effort of someone else affect my grade.  I feel the same at work - I'd rather be solely responsible for a project and succeed or fail on my own than rely on others (and, to be fair, I'd rather not make them rely on me; I'm a procrastinator who is used to churning out good stuff at the last second, and my procrastination drives people who need a more structured plan crazy).  If I did something that allowed me to work for myself, perhaps I'd follow in your footsteps and become self-employed.

 

I don't have any issues with it aside from the stupid fans and the exorbitant amounts of money players and coaches get. It's ridiculous how teachers and other incredibly essential professions are sorely underpaid and atheletes are completely spoiled.

 

There's a line in the movie "The Program" (about a fictional college football program, although it was basically Florida State), in which the coach tells a professor who wants to suspend a star player for underperforming in class something along the lines of, "When's the last time 80,000 people showed up to watch a kid take a chemistry test?"

 

I'm not passing judgment one way or the other (although I do think teachers are underpaid), I've just always enjoyed that line.

 

I hate watching sport. People who enjoy it baffle me. To me, it's just the accepted version of porn, without the good bits of porn. People watching other people do something that should be fun. Even worse is that 'tribes' develop because of it. I have a friend who legitimately hates a person the minute he finds out they support a rival team. It's fucking retarded. He could be getting on great with them but the minute he finds out that they arbitrarily follow another group of unconnected, overpayed people than his particular team (a team that has none of the members he originally followed them for) he will just abandon them.

 

 

I grew up in Central Ohio, and was raised to be an Ohio State fan.  Ohio State has an intense rivalry with Michigan, one that would probably make many of you here shake your heads in disbelief.

 

I know that it's silly, but it's just so ingrained in me that as soon as I learn someone is from Michigan I assume that they're just a terrible person - and I'm only somewhat kidding.  My mom's husband is from Michigan, though, and I think that he's fantastic, so obviously some people escape the stench and squalor to become good people, though.

 

Things that many of you may not believe, but are true about the Ohio State-Michigan rivalry:

1) Our state once delayed a recount in an election because the law stated that a recount cannot stop once it has started, and it was estimated that the recount would take until sometime past the OSU-Michigan game, and officials didn't want to make people miss the game.  So we delayed the results of an election by weeks just so that a few dozen people wouldn't miss a football game.

 

2) A man asked a judge for, and was granted, a slightly longer jail term than he was originally given on the condition that the jail term not start until the day after the Ohio State-Michigan game.

 

3) Just last week, Ohio's state legislature passed a law outlawing the letter "M" for the entirety of Saturday, November 30 (game day).  'M's were crossed out or taped over in many public documents, on statues, signs, etc.

 

4) Many OSU fans refuse to even say "Michigan", referring instead to "that team up north".  This is largely due to a coach we had in the 50s, 60s, and 70s who started the practice.  That same coach once ran out of gas while driving out of Michigan back to Ohio, and made two of his assistant coaches push his car the remaining few miles across the state line rather than buy gas in Michigan and put money into that state's economy.

 

Oh... and all of this seems perfectly reasonable and normal to many of us.

 

This is a spot on example of the associated culture that seems to so often go hand in glove with sport.

 

I've worked with people who have come in to work on a Monday, genuinely demoralised, sad or angry over the failure of "their" team to succeed over the weekend. Also had work colleagues spoil a works outing by falling out over some inter-team dispute.

 

Perhaps sport should be added to list of subjects best avoided in social situations such as politics and religion.

 

I've been sad over results before (once, an unexpected Ohio State loss cost me a Christmas gift of a trip to California at a time when I'd never been further west than Indiana), but I haven't let it affect me emotionally.  I've seen my favorite teams suffer terrible losses, and yet I've never yelled at someone because of it, kicked a dog, or been in a bad mood for days.  I'm disappointed, then I move on - after all, it's not like I was on the field.

 

I have seen guys like you describe, though.  A guy in my freshman dorm back in college... I saw him sobbing in his room after his favorite NFL team lost an early season regular season game.  That's just insane, especially considering that his team was and is perennially not successful. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...