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Sapience leaves LOTRO


vr00mie
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Good riddance to one of the largest detriments to the game! Frelorn will be a HUGE improvement for the LOTRO Forums, can't wait for the Sap to hit the road.

As for whether or not he'll be a good CM with the charity he's going to? I'd say the entire paradigm is different, you don't treat the people you're trying to extract donations from the same way you treat the users of a forum.

That said I honestly do not see quality people skills displayed in the vast majority of interactions Ricky boy has had over the years so I'm not going to be surprised if he fails hard where he's going. Working for a charity is hard, long hours and low pay but there can be satisfaction in the results. I sincerely hope Ricky learns how to treat people with dignity and respect at his new job, it's a skill he's going to need and there are a lot of kids that will benefit if he can change his ways....

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As for whether or not he'll be a good CM with the charity he's going to? I'd say the entire paradigm is different, you don't treat the people you're trying to extract donations from the same way you treat the users of a forum.

 

 

Uh dude...?  If I get to deal with an asshole at some charity, I'm more likely to donate anyways ("Think of the penguins!").

 

As a customer, on the other hand, Sappos can make me take my money elsewhere in many ways (my case, wasn't only his shitty attitude, but how he whitewashed and covered up the whole lag mess which in turn made the game unplayable, aka adding insult to injury)

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As for whether or not he'll be a good CM with the charity he's going to? I'd say the entire paradigm is different, you don't treat the people you're trying to extract donations from the same way you treat the users of a forum.

 

I gave some money to several charities, but you can be sure that I won't give an euro-cent to that one. It would make me sick to be even 0.001% of any money that asshat can earn through it.

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I don't give to charities at all. There's no real purpose to them.

I don't think there's anything wrong with not giving to charities. But, there absolutely is a purpose to many of them.

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Frelorn looks like a pro so far. A massive improvement. General trolling on the forums seems gone as well, or at least diminished to a degree that I haven't encountered it for weeks. 

 

I don't know how it was possible that Sapience was given that job and then allowed to keep it for so long. Even if Lotro's previous producer wanted censorship, it could've been done without having an asshole for a community manager.

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I've given to one charity this year, and since I don't work, that is my limit.

It's one close to my heart, as well.

Cats Protection.

I purchased items off their amazon wishlist and sent it straight there!

Most of my donations have gone to our local animal rescue places. I see a very real and important purpose in taking care of animals that are abused or neglected. I'm not a huge fan of sending checks to big national organizations, because it's too hard to know where the money goes, but with the groups doing good in your own neighborhood, you can stop by and see what they're doing. My volunteer time similarly goes to schools/libraries in my backyard; I know the kids/parents/teachers and can make informed decisions about where my time is best spent.

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Most of my donations have gone to our local animal rescue places. I see a very real and important purpose in taking care of animals that are abused or neglected. I'm not a huge fan of sending checks to big national organizations, because it's too hard to know where the money goes, but with the groups doing good in your own neighborhood, you can stop by and see what they're doing. My volunteer time similarly goes to schools/libraries in my backyard; I know the kids/parents/teachers and can make informed decisions about where my time is best spent.

Local charities and national both have their pros/cons about fund transparency and the like. In the U.S., I believe states usually have their own state-based nonprofit databases you can search for overhead accountability, etc., and there are groups like Charity Navigator for wider search parameters. Keep in mind that due to government requirements, nonprofits need to report their financials and stuff, so I'd always check charity watchdogs on reputation and for detailed reports. Just because a nonprofit is a small local group doesn't mean they're necessarily efficient about funds either; I've seen it both ways.

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Do you lean more towards either government programmes or charity from people in the community?

If you're asking which would I prefer, then neither. I'm all for privatisation for charitable things. Big companies or exceedingly rich people putting lots of money towards a cause they have full control over themselves.

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If you're asking which would I prefer, then neither. I'm all for privatisation for charitable things. Big companies or exceedingly rich people putting lots of money towards a cause they have full control over themselves.

 

In your mind, would big companies/rich people perform charity better than person-to-person charity efforts from the local community?

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In your mind, would big companies/rich people perform charity better than person-to-person charity efforts from the local community?

 

I think Doro might feel a little like I do. I'm not a fan of 'charities' because they are essentially big companies that employ huge numbers of staff. Donations don't all go to the cause but instead pay staff wages. The person running the organisation is often on a 100k plus salary and some in the UK get paid more than the Prime Minister. How can that be right?

 

I know charities argue they need to pay their chiefs a competitive wage in order to get the best staff possible which will be of benefit to the charity as they will generate money due to their expertise. I just wish they were more transparent. They employ pushy sales people who harass shoppers in town centres and use guilt driven campaigns to make people think they are helping others. 

 

Like Doro I'm all for wealthy individuals and companies doing their own charity work where they are in full control. I'm not sure how I feel about charities as companies as it just seems like big business and smokescreen tactics. They should be classed as a company that invests profits into charitable causes. Only a fraction of what you donate goes to the cause and I don't think this is made clear.

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In your mind, would big companies/rich people perform charity better than person-to-person charity efforts from the local community?

Pretty much what Mallorn has said, but I also think local community efforts, such as volunteering, are a good idea. Just not giving money over, because it rarely ends up where it is needed.

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Mallorn, which is exactly why charity watchdogs are important. See above. People who don't understand how nonprofits work in relation to the IRS and federal requirements tend to view those things as highly suspicious (which they should, because there are plenty of frauds out there), but dismissing the entire structure is a simple ignorance: Charities ARE required to report their financials, at least in the U.S. You can download their IRS 990 forms and audits.

That's not to say charities are necessarily 100% transparent either, but they're a whole lot more regulated than a private corporation that avoids audits and the like; the key to charity work is lowest percent overhead per dollar. Basically, donors need to do a little more legwork because the data are out there, and pick specific charities that perform the way you want them to.

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Mallorn, which is exactly why charity watchdogs are important. See above. People who don't understand how nonprofits work in relation to the IRS and federal requirements tend to view those things as highly suspicious (which they should, because there are plenty of frauds out there), but dismissing the entire structure is a simple ignorance: Charities ARE required to report their financials, at least in the U.S. You can download their IRS 990 forms and audits.

That's not to say charities are necessarily 100% transparent either, but they're a whole lot more regulated than a private corporation that avoids audits and the like; the key to charity work is lowest percent overhead per dollar. Basically, donors need to do a little more legwork because the data are out there, and pick specific charities that perform the way you want them to.

 

I think we have watchdogs too in the UK.

 

It's charity practices and guilt tactics I am suspicious of. Don't know if you get this in the US, but in the UK charity sales people are often in town centres approaching shoppers to try and get them to sign up to donate money monthly via Direct Debit from their bank account. They are a nuisance and can be very pushy. 

 

We also have a lot of ads over here saying things like "Just £10 a month can feed a family for one week. Please please donate, help little Timmy" etc. I find these ads misleading as they imply that if you donate £10 it will be used for that purpose when in actual fact that money would be used to pay staff, property rent, sales people to harass shoppers etc. Ads like them make me feel like the charity is trying to trick people and I believe them to be disingenuous. 

 

I tend not to donate to large charities because I hate their underhand practices - they are run aggressively and I don't think it is appropriate.

 

I don't disagree with charities and I am sure many do great work, I just wish they weren't so sneaky. 

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I recall hearing last year (maybe the year before) that some group of economists (or maybe a consulting firm) was offering their services to charities, to help them use their money more efficiently, but only a few charities took them up on it, and most of those that did turned out to be incredibly inefficient/were spending far too much money on administrative costs and too little on the actual point of their charity.

 

Oddly, after seeing such reports, other charities didn't want the outside group investigating and helping them.

 

I can't remember where I heard this, though - maybe someone else heard a similar story and can find a link?

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If more charities worked together they could cut their admin costs. There are so many charities that they could work together, there are over 164000 charities in England and Wales with over £63 billion pounds of annual income.

http://www.charitycommission.gov.uk/about-charities/sector-facts-and-figures/

Also those collecting in the street with cans get up to 25% of what they collect as a payment for collecting the money, and it they are selling anything like soft toys or wrist bands they normally get a cut of that money as well.

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If more charities worked together they could cut their admin costs. There are so many charities that they could work together, there are over 164000 charities in England and Wales with over £63 billion pounds of annual income.

http://www.charitycommission.gov.uk/about-charities/sector-facts-and-figures/

Also those collecting in the street with cans get up to 25% of what they collect as a payment for collecting the money, and it they are selling anything like soft toys or wrist bands they normally get a cut of that money as well.

 

 

We've had trouble with people collecting for bogus charities at traffic intersections. They actually pocket all of the money themselves. I've seen the same group of people collecting for different 'charities' using homemade signs and buckets. If you want to see them run really fast just take a photo of them with your phone.  })

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We've had trouble with people collecting for bogus charities at traffic intersections. They actually pocket all of the money themselves. I've seen the same group of people collecting for different 'charities' using homemade signs and buckets. If you want to see them run really fast just take a photo of them with your phone.  })

Not sure I have ever seen bogus collectors, but I have heard that some of the schemes that deliver bags to houses asking people to put old clothes they want to donate in them are fake as there can be really good money in old clothes

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Not sure I have ever seen bogus collectors, but I have heard that some of the schemes that deliver bags to houses asking people to put old clothes they want to donate in them are fake as there can be really good money in old clothes

 

And I've heard that many people who work in charity shops take anything if it is worth a bit or really good.

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Not sure I have ever seen bogus collectors, but I have heard that some of the schemes that deliver bags to houses asking people to put old clothes they want to donate in them are fake as there can be really good money in old clothes

 

Oh, I hadn't heard of the clothing scam. Yikes! We've given clothing to disabled veteran's organization, but I usually donate to a local pickup station for women & children who are escaping abusive relationships. Hopefully they are both legitimate. 

 

If you do a search for 'Bogus Charity Collecting' on a news search you'll see this happens a lot. Luckily some of these dishonest folks get caught.

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And I've heard that many people who work in charity shops take anything if it is worth a bit or really good.

This is true, I did some volunteering in a charity shop and a few of the staff had put stuff away and bought it latter, for a very silly price. I wasnt there for too long and during my time there was nothing good that I seen. Although you see stories in the paper of people that bought some bowl in a charity shop for 50 pence and it turns out to be rare and sells for over £1000

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