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Darmokk

General gaming frustration in late 2014

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There is one resounding advantage to Always on-line. It is indeed DRM. Pirated games are so 2013.

 

That said, having control over to patch or not, the ability to mod your own game and the ability to keep playing forever even if the service shuts down are no small things either.

 

I guess all the pirating we did came with a price. Enter the era of Always on-line gaming.

 

Except the DRM very often is cracked or the client-server communication is simulated with a server emulator, leaving the paying users with a worse product than the pirates.

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There once was a time where crackers and pirates did us a service by providing us free content.

 

Those days are gone.

 

They now add trojans to their cracks or pirated content, or screw legit players over. And they ask money for the hacks they produce.

 

Basically they've become businesses of their own. And with that they became greedy too.

 

It's come down to the point where if you want to play a truly competetive level playing field game, you'd better resort to table and board.

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I actually think that "always online" is one of the better forms of DRM.

Not that I like it but better than system-invasive DRM. I also like that with an online-only DRM I can go to any computer in the house and play right away without installing and entering license keys (assuming it doesn't do stupid install-time only registry entries but most games stopped doing that).

Online only DRM does not require "broadband". If it is for DRM only a really slow modem or cellphone connection would do. What is missing here, IMHO, is that US households have no way of falling back to connecting with low bandwidth through the cellphone they already pay for when their ISP has a problem. The above-ground wiring also means that the whole house connectivity thing is fragile and in a snowstorm there aren't enough repair crews.

I really think that tethering (at low bandwidth) as a fallback should be more commonplace and should be supported as a standard feature in e.g. the routers that most people use where their house connects to an ISP anyway.

[this post is exclusively concerned with DRM use of "online only". Abusing it to enforce that everybody uses the latest version even in single player is not covered by my sympathetic view]

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I really think that tethering (at low bandwidth) as a fallback should be more commonplace and should be supported as a standard feature in e.g. the routers that most people use where their house connects to an ISP anyway.

 

I just think it's the kind of products that leaves you with a bad brand. It screams "our product is so shit you need a backup system".

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I just think it's the kind of products that leaves you with a bad brand. It screams "our product is so shit you need a backup system".

Internet connections in the US *are* shit :)

Commiecast doesn't even pretend to be a real ISP, they say they are a cable company who offers some side products. With the overhead lines and other random reliability problems the price/performance/reliability ratio seems out of whack.

On a more serious note, I can't think that the direct scenario would happen, which would be that if you have a cellphone and ISP with Verizon that the house router provided by Verizon would fall back to your tethering cellphone. Apart from what you say that would also wipe out the cellphone network when there is a multi-block outage of the ground internet.

But I still think that given how technology has developed lately, with US buyers of ground Internet serves getting shafted, with wide availability of cellphone data, there should be a premade product for this. A router that has 2 wifi chips and if the ISP goes down tries to connect your house through your tethering cellphone.

Of course if you have a family you would not allow any high-bandwidth things through it. But email, DRM/steam (no download), IM/chat and facebook would work.

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I really think that tethering (at low bandwidth) as a fallback should be more commonplace and should be supported as a standard feature in e.g. the routers that most people use where their house connects to an ISP anyway.

You can get a PC bluetooth adapter very cheaply now. You can then bluetooth to your smartphone and tether it if you wish.

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You can get a PC bluetooth adapter very cheaply now. You can then bluetooth to your smartphone and tether it if you wish.

Well, I, myself, can connect through my cellphone any time.

I am thinking of the typical family sitting at home with Internet down. How does the tech lead of the family enable a reasonable amount of service? I think it is easy enough to communicate that high bandwidth activity is out. (let's leave aside that many people will not restrict themselves from full-bandwidth usage under any circumstances)

But in practice such a family already pays for a low-bandwidth service that could be centrally connected. And it would make always-online DRM much more practical.

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Maybe it's time for the US to join us in the 21st Century.

Not with Commiecast and Verizon we won't.

I guess the only hope is Google fiber, or maybe (the horror oh the horror) cities themselves put in gigabit lines. Communism! Well better than what we get tossed by our non-competition companies.

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There is one resounding advantage to Always on-line. It is indeed DRM. Pirated games are so 2013.

 

That said, having control over to patch or not, the ability to mod your own game and the ability to keep playing forever even if the service shuts down are no small things either.

 

I guess all the pirating we did came with a price. Enter the era of Always on-line gaming.

Even if we would live in alternative 0 piracy world both currently and historically, game companies would still push always-online. 

 

It is about control over consumer game experience first and foremost, because that translate directly to money most.

 

I would say that always online and other forms of DRMs are made for (in order from most to least important) following reasons:

 

1. Control over consumer experience

2. To increase Monetization (microtranactions, DLC, etc)

3. To make used-game sales/re-sale obsolete. Every consumer need to pay game company for new product.

4. Piracy.   Yes piracy is least important.

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For me the biggest draw back of always online is when the company no longer wants to operate the servers, that is the game done.

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There once was a time where crackers and pirates did us a service by providing us free content.

 

Those days are gone.

 

They now add trojans to their cracks or pirated content, or screw legit players over. And they ask money for the hacks they produce.

You are clueless. They still provide free software, and very little of it has trojans. I wonder where you are getting such wrong information - that all pirated content is with malware or is not free. Again, very little cracked software has malware.

I really think that tethering (at low bandwidth) as a fallback should be more commonplace and should be supported as a standard feature in e.g. the routers that most people use where their house connects to an ISP anyway.

 

Using wireless for the internet in the US would cost an average of $700 to $800 a month. I just heard an expert talk about this. 

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There's still quite a few countries, and a lot of American states that still don't have broadband, I have quite a few friends in the US that can't get broadband and have to rely on very slow dial up or choppy satellite connections.

 

It's not a case of "a lot of American states that still don't have broadband". All US states have broadband. It's a case of two unfortunate factors:

 

1. Your friends must live way out on farms and tiny towns in the middle of nowhere. Bear in mind, the average US state is roughly half the land area of the entire country of England. People here are capable of living in places significantly more remote than anywhere in your country. It's not cost effective for giant cable companies to lay down the coaxial cable necessary to service every small town and farm in the country. There have been some communities that have built their own internet infrastructure, and an impotent push by some people on "the left"(or what passes for it, anyways) to push for nationalized broadband. These efforts have been hindered or outright blocked by the other, larger reason...

 

2. The United States is completely controlled by a number of extremely big and powerful corporate interests that are heavily invested in maintaining our status quo. They literally own our political process, via owning our politicians. This is why we don't have Universal Health Care, why our public transit is complete shit, and why so many of our public schools are worse than what you'll find in some developing countries.

 

Not only do these corporations control our politicians, they also control virtually our entire media. Almost every single major media outlet in the US is owned between 6 mega corporations. They decide what we hear and what we don't hear about. All issues are framed in whatever context is most amenable to the owners of said media outlets. Universal Health Care is labelled as communism. Public transit is labelled as communism. Public schools are labelled as a form of communism. Government laying down thousands of miles of their own coaxial cable(not controlled by billion dollar cable companies) so that Bob the Farmer in Montana can play MMOs? You'd better believe that media consumers(i.e. voters) would be warned against this slippery slope into godless socialism. "Besides, who would pay for it all? Get your filthy hands away from my tax dollars, Obama!"

 

Don't believe me? Just wait until Darthalion(sp?) posts a rebuttal to me here. XD

 

Non-Americans should always remember to factor this stuff in when thinking about stuff in the US. We should serve as a cautionary tale to you as to why you don't dare allow profit motive to compete with the common good.

 

 

Not with Commiecast and Verizon we won't.

I guess the only hope is Google fiber, or maybe (the horror oh the horror) cities themselves put in gigabit lines. Communism! Well better than what we get tossed by our non-competition companies.

 

You should stop calling them "Commiecast". You yourself just showed why they're anything but communist. "Nazicast" or "Authoritariancast" would be more literally accurate.

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Not with Commiecast and Verizon we won't.

I guess the only hope is Google fiber, or maybe (the horror oh the horror) cities themselves put in gigabit lines. Communism! Well better than what we get tossed by our non-competition companies.

 

I want Google Fiber so bad... Time Shitter Cable and Verizon lobbied the city government to not allow Google Fiber.

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So the worst has happened. I bought F1 2013.

Holy cow. Me and the gaming industry are so far, so far out of sync. Let's lease aside that now Steam has after all decided to forcefully upgrade itself and let me wait. Open source software never does that.

The first thing about F1 2013 is that it has a raw console interface. On the PC. There is a dialog, full screen, with a single text entry box. Don't think pressing keys enters text. Don't think that the mouse is connected to a mouse cursor so that you can click on the text field to change that. No, you are expected to magically know that the return key is the equivalent to some random game controller key enabling text input. Terrible. I hate console interfaces so much. On PC, anyway. Never owned a console. Never will.

Gameplay. I drive around. Joystick does NIL. Why? This racing game doesn't support a joystick. Say what?

But that isn't all. I managed to buy, and I mean I had tried so far to avoid that, a racing game which has on/off only steering. I suppose if you buy a wheel and pedal hardware set then you get gradual steering. But now the thing goes like the 1986 Ford I once had where the only positions for steering are full left, middle, full right. I mean. WTF? I am so angry. It isn't the wasted $30. It is the humiliation that I ended up with this.

I can't find any indication that this game has any form of wing adjustments or allows you to try different tires.

Last but not least, it looks meh. It looks like it doesn't use PC graphics at all and runs at a TV resolution, or the texture quality for one anyway, all the time.

Have you tried this?

 

http://rfactor.net/

 

I've never played it, but some co-workers do, and from what I've been told setting up your car is very important, you race against real people. Steering wheel is mandatory, you can use a KYBD, but you'll suck at racing.

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There's still quite a few countries, and a lot of American states that still don't have broadband, I have quite a few friends in the US that can't get broadband and have to rely on very slow dial up or choppy satellite connections.

They have to be living in the sticks then. Every largish city in the US has broadband.

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You should stop calling them "Commiecast". You yourself just showed why they're anything but communist. "Nazicast" or "Authoritariancast" would be more literally accurate.

They have to be living in the sticks then. Every largish city in the US has broadband.

Cambridge, MA, one of the mother cities of the Internet with MIT and Harvard and all the other schools, and home to much of the scientific progress in computers over the decades, has essentially only one high-speed (*) ISP, Comcast. Verizon has declined to put FiOS into Cambridge directly saying that they want to cash in on the FiOS they have (elsewhere) and don't plan to do anything.

Cambridge, MA, doesn't have its own Comcast office, the next one is over in Somerville.

You have to ignore Yelp reviews (itself more corrupt than anything) but there are some good example of comparing that location to Hitler and the Nazis.

(*) high speed, maybe, but with throttling of some services, and with a total transmission cap per month.

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Cambridge, MA, one of the mother cities of the Internet with MIT and Harvard and all the other schools, and home to much of the scientific progress in computers over the decades, has essentially only one high-speed (*) ISP, Comcast. Verizon has declined to put FiOS into Cambridge directly saying that they want to cash in on the FiOS they have (elsewhere) and don't plan to do anything.

Cambridge, MA, doesn't have its own Comcast office, the next one is over in Somerville.

You have to ignore Yelp reviews (itself more corrupt than anything) but there are some good example of comparing that location to Hitler and the Nazis.

(*) high speed, maybe, but with throttling of some services, and with a total transmission cap per month.

I agree Comcast sucks, but I thought we were talking about real ISP's :P

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Have you tried this?

 

http://rfactor.net/

 

I've never played it, but some co-workers do, and from what I've been told setting up your car is very important, you race against real people. Steering wheel is mandatory, you can use a KYBD, but you'll suck at racing.

Looks good. I guess people made add-ons to play the past-license parts of F1?

I followed some of the mod links and to be honest I don't know which mods are actually for rfactor. The websites are a bit brutal... :)

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Good grief.. you guys still get the draconian max GB per month?

 

South of the Rio Grande, you pay a monthly fee, you can leave torrents up stream perfectly legitimate video 24/7 and your fees and bandwidth remains the same.  Sooome companies will offer plans of "5GB a month" but that's mostly for phones, because home connection, no one's really stupid enough to fall for THAT.

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Good grief.. you guys still get the draconian max GB per month?

It's in the contract, although they do not enforce it.

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ISPs in the US are also the providers of broadcast media. So their internet is in competition with the television. Of course, because there IS no true competition, they keep the price of internet very high to prevent people from just dropping cable entirely and going full internet. They need to keep profit up to keep investors busy investing. It's not about providing service anymore, if it ever was. It's about charging as much as they can for as little as they have to provide. And every time they buy a new sports deal, every cable bill goes up to compensate. Even people who don't sub to ESPN and other sports channels pay to support sports broadcasts. I can't imagine why people put up with it.

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It's in the contract, although they do not enforce it.

 

Who is they? In most of the US they enforce the monthly cap. If a Telecom company has a reason to charge you extra, they usually do it (in the US).

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