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Lotro PvPers...are they really that bad?


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Ha I remember that sensation well. Especially for the first few years, that sudden clatter of hooves spelled doom: one CC application and it was often as not gray screen time. On the same token I remember catching myself randomly tracking on my hunter while running around in pve, apparently unwilling to accept that wargs hadn't followed me to Mirkwood or wherever I was.

​I had an LM friend who kept himself stun-dotted everywhere, at all times.  Even places like the Bree AH or the 21st Hall.  If you were a friend/kinnie and within range, regardless of zone, he kept *you* stun-dotted at all times too.

Because you never know.

Needless to say, he was crushed by the nerf to SoP:R in Helms Deep.

Edited by Belechannas
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It's entirely up to the companies to decide how to interpret the NDA in relation to my comments. If they want to 'come after me', as you put it, they know who I am. I do appreciate your concern on t

Modbreak: Dear GameDev, Please refrain from posting personal information on this board. Given your geolocation, it might be perceived as a rather vengeful thing. Say hi to the rest of Turbine

I agree with this on a personal level. First post here although I consider this forum superior to the official one (where most of my posts over the years were confined to grants on rank x threads)

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My understanding is that it was a budgetary decision but that isn't first hand information on my part.

 

Totally unrelated trivia...Harry Chase, the voice of Gandalf in SoA: hilarious guy. He had the sound guys busting up the whole time he was in house for recording sessions. Sadly none of the outtakes I acquired are SFW

​But SURELY they are safe for HERE! :)

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Research had long since shown that players who became involved in a socially active kinship tended to retain their subscriptions notably longer than those who did not; it never made sense to me why we let the social aspect of the game slip. By SoM we were doing virtually nothing to actively engage with the players outside of Beta (where Jared E and Rachel P did as much as they could on that score), in particular on the US servers. Nor did we sufficiently recognize those players who did so much to keep that vital social aspect going. I have a tremendous respect for the kin and tribe leaders who go that extra mile as a player to assume the extra work (and sometimes headaches) of leadership. Their importance to LOTRO over the years deserved far more official recognition than was ever given.

​I personally put a ton of effort into my own kinship's website; much of the distinctiveness relied on the MyLotro XML download. I was less than happy when that disappeared.

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  • 3 weeks later...

New to the forums, saw this was posted on Elendilmirs faecbook page, I have only managed to get through a few pages in the hour I'v been reading your responses Aylwen and I thank you for your enlightening posts. I would just like to say I applied for a job at Turbine near 5 years ago now (?), Sapience actually got me an interview. I showed up early so I sat in the lobby I guess you could call it for about a half hour with random people walking through literally asking me what the hell I was waiting for, there was a video on loop on several TV screens including the one behind the unoccupied secretaries desk about DDO and LOTRO that I basically had memorized by the time I actually got into the interview. As I said after 30 minutes someone came out and got me, took me through the facility, like a penny tour, saw the war room, saw the massive cubical section you have posted many pictures of, and all the other arcade games that bordered the rooms so people working on the actual game could relax their brains a bit and play other stuff. I was then taken into a small white room where I was interviewed by two people, twice (4 people total). On my cover letter I had put that I was a lifetime member and for about 2 years was the highest ranking pvper in the game and at the time had a rank 14 warg making me the highest ranked warg in the U.S. (as I was the first rank 14 in the U.S. though I had been passed in points by one other warg) (just before the interview Cowlick of Elendilmir and either Xkillah of Brandywine or Grizlark of Elendilmir passed me infamy wise on the same day). Both sets of interviewers literally their first question was "why do you keep pvping?" the first time I simply said because I find it fun and it holds my attention, the 2nd time I got a little angry and actually replied with a question "is this to satisfy your curiosity or does this actually have any relevance to me getting a job?" to which they replied they where just curious as they never had anyone with any sufficient rank ever come in looking for a job, they then said they had someone on staff in the past (guess he was laid off or left) that may have had a rank 13 but that was it, no one else pvped to the extent the two of us had then they expounded on it by saying that most people working there don't even log much time in actual live game. I should have probably walked out at that point because from those responses I should have known nothing was going to come of the interview but I continued, explaining that I had a maxed out freep char as well that was at the time in the premier pve kin on Meneldor, explaining that my kinship was world first or one of in defeating the Rift, nofly Thorogs, the Watcher and other raids. At the end they gave me a written test that I know I failed but don't think it lost me the job, it had a bunch of stuff on it like what does RAM stand for (I build computers and know they are the sticks of batteries I put in my computer to make things faster but have not actually committed what R.A.M. actually stands for to memory (Random Access Memory)). So I went about guessing what I could and walked out feeling repetitively confident at the time (even though I know I failed that test miserably) as all the interviewers had said it was the best interview they had ever been apart of even though it was literally my first ever. Needless to say I didn't get the job, and found out that they literally choose someone else who lived down the street from me since we where both children, we are both from the same town in Rhode Island so the commute was the same, he had applied 3 months earlier than I. It was at this point that I realized (and this may be the cynic in me but it's how I feel) that they literally only invited me there to see the freak nerd who spends so much time in a side-part of the game. My friend ended up getting laid off three months after he began working for the Turbine. I was at first jealous that he got the job, but after hearing he was laid off (last one in first one out type thing I guess) I honestly didn't feel to bad about it, and held out hope for a call from Turbine in the future like he got, even though i felt the way I did knowing what I knew at that point, because, it's a job and one I would probably have fun doing. It's been 5 years, and now seeing your posts I'm thoroughly disheartened, the players council was a gimmick (another thing about turbine I had hoped to be apart of as some of my ideas had been getting relayed through the Elendilmir representatives at the time anyway). But mainly disheartened in how you view the industry, I have come up with a game I am attempting to patent and from what you have described about the slow death of Turbine and the quality of work and how it could have been better I am left to wonder if I do get the patent (which atm is at least a $10,000 investment in itself) and am allowed some artistic freedom money/if it's bought by a company allowing, is this what I have to look forward to? I really hope not but your posts are most enlightening and again thank you for relaying your experience. Sorry for the wall of text.

 

Best Regards to all,

-Azsouth of Elendilmir, Anoden of Meneldor

New to the forums, saw this was posted on Elendilmirs faecbook page, I have only managed to get through a few pages in the hour I'v been reading your responses Aylwen and I thank you for your enlightening posts. I would just like to say I applied for a job at Turbine near 5 years ago now (?), Sapience actually got me an interview. I showed up early so I sat in the lobby I guess you could call it for about a half hour with random people walking through literally asking me what the hell I was waiting for, there was a video on loop on several TV screens including the one behind the unoccupied secretaries desk about DDO and LOTRO that I basically had memorized by the time I actually got into the interview. As I said after 30 minutes someone came out and got me, took me through the facility, like a penny tour, saw the war room, saw the massive cubical section you have posted many pictures of, and all the other arcade games that bordered the rooms so people working on the actual game could relax their brains a bit and play other stuff. I was then taken into a small white room where I was interviewed by two people, twice (4 people total). On my cover letter I had put that I was a lifetime member and for about 2 years was the highest ranking pvper in the game and at the time had a rank 14 warg making me the highest ranked warg in the U.S. (as I was the first rank 14 in the U.S. though I had been passed in points by one other warg) (just before the interview Cowlick of Elendilmir and either Xkillah of Brandywine or Grizlark of Elendilmir passed me infamy wise on the same day). Both sets of interviewers literally their first question was "why do you keep pvping?" the first time I simply said because I find it fun and it holds my attention, the 2nd time I got a little angry and actually replied with a question "is this to satisfy your curiosity or does this actually have any relevance to me getting a job?" to which they replied they where just curious as they never had anyone with any sufficient rank ever come in looking for a job, they then said they had someone on staff in the past (guess he was laid off or left) that may have had a rank 13 but that was it, no one else pvped to the extent the two of us had then they expounded on it by saying that most people working there don't even log much time in actual live game. I should have probably walked out at that point because from those responses I should have known nothing was going to come of the interview but I continued, explaining that I had a maxed out freep char as well that was at the time in the premier pve kin on Meneldor, explaining that my kinship was world first or one of in defeating the Rift, nofly Thorogs, the Watcher and other raids. At the end they gave me a written test that I know I failed but don't think it lost me the job, it had a bunch of stuff on it like what does RAM stand for (I build computers and know they are the sticks of batteries I put in my computer to make things faster but have not actually committed what R.A.M. actually stands for to memory (Random Access Memory)). So I went about guessing what I could and walked out feeling repetitively confident at the time (even though I know I failed that test miserably) as all the interviewers had said it was the best interview they had ever been apart of even though it was literally my first ever. Needless to say I didn't get the job, and found out that they literally choose someone else who lived down the street from me since we where both children, we are both from the same town in Rhode Island so the commute was the same, he had applied 3 months earlier than I. It was at this point that I realized (and this may be the cynic in me but it's how I feel) that they literally only invited me there to see the freak nerd who spends so much time in a side-part of the game. My friend ended up getting laid off three months after he began working for the Turbine. I was at first jealous that he got the job, but after hearing he was laid off (last one in first one out type thing I guess) I honestly didn't feel to bad about it, and held out hope for a call from Turbine in the future like he got, even though i felt the way I did knowing what I knew at that point, because, it's a job and one I would probably have fun doing. It's been 5 years, and now seeing your posts I'm thoroughly disheartened, the players council was a gimmick (another thing about turbine I had hoped to be apart of as some of my ideas had been getting relayed through the Elendilmir representatives at the time anyway). But mainly disheartened in how you view the industry, I have come up with a game I am attempting to patent and from what you have described about the slow death of Turbine and the quality of work and how it could have been better I am left to wonder if I do get the patent (which atm is at least a $10,000 investment in itself) and am allowed some artistic freedom money/if it's bought by a company allowing, is this what I have to look forward to? I really hope not but your posts are most enlightening and again thank you for relaying your experience. Sorry for the wall of text.

 

Best Regards to all,

-Azsouth of Elendilmir, Anoden of Meneldor

Apologies for the necro.  Hello fellow meneldorian!  I think that  certain factors produce this type of game company. I would say how big of game you want to create and who you hire to produce said game really effects more than the industry as a whole.  

It was scary to learn that tricky Rick pretty much was unsupervised.  I used to think he was simply spouting what he was told  to. I think we have learned some incite to not only what's makes a company plummet but what can make them stronger.   

Communication.  Obviously this was a challenge at turbine.  Nothing bi weekly meetings between the separate depts could not have fixed.  It worked great for when I was a manufacturers rep as well as selling through our distribution company.  I met will my own division but I also spent time in the warehouse and delivery driver.  

OK ups is on strike so now we have different delivery techniques.  If someone got misshipped it was nice to know I had to feed them to make things better.  The other reps who did not visit the warehouse regularly fell sharply when times became tough.  As low as 20% down from previous year.  While I was at 5% growth.  

Good communication is king.  

Listening to the customers.  Self explanatory.

Do not spread resources thin.

Pay/reward the employees accordingly.  Bonuses for jobs well done.  Provide proper benefits for experienced staff. Have a checks and balances.  

​Just for my own curiosity i was curious (without giving copywrite specifics). What genre of game are you getting into?   

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​Just for my own curiosity i was curious (without giving copywrite specifics). What genre of game are you getting into?   

​I spoke to a lawyer, you need an actual product which is beyond my capabilities, so I need to shop my game idea around to companies I think can make it with any degree of success, the lawyer to his credit was actually sad because he saw the prospectus I had wrote and thought it would be a great game apparently you can't patent ideas. Which means I have to be very careful with what I say about it because it's still not protected, in fact when shopping it to companies I need them to sign non-disclosure agreements so that way if they decide they don't like me but they like my idea and attempt to steal it I can sue them or at least have some legal recourse to attempt to get my intellectual property back, so I saved the money I had planed on putting towards the patent, unfortunately now I need to get in contact with heads of gaming companies who probably get bombarded daily with ideas or attempt to start my own company and hire people. For the second option I'd need someone bankrolling the whole thing as I don't have the money to hire and sustain staff while developing the game. All I will is, is that the game intends to be a hybrid, giving the player a lot of freedom in what they want to do in this world I plan to create. I know that is not much to go on but if it is ever picked up by a company and the idea secured I'd be more than happy to go into extreme detail about what I would like my game to be. Thanks for your interest.

sorry it doesn't really answer your question,

-Azsouth/Anoden

Edited by Azsouth
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I think there are 2 important questions you have to ask yourself:

- Is it technical possible (without enormous costs) to make your idea into a game
- Is there enough demand for such a game

If you can say Yes to both questions and have a fairly good way to prove your Yesses, you could maybe try to kickstart it for example or find private investors. The great risk with going the big gaming companies is that they use your idea to make a look-a-like game that just is enough different from your idea.

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​I spoke to a lawyer, you need an actual product which is beyond my capabilities, so I need to shop my game idea around to companies I think can make it with any degree of success, the lawyer to his credit was actually sad because he saw the prospectus I had wrote and thought it would be a great game apparently you can't patent ideas. Which means I have to be very careful with what I say about it because it's still not protected, in fact when shopping it to companies I need them to sign non-disclosure agreements so that way if they decide they don't like me but they like my idea and attempt to steal it I can sue them or at least have some legal recourse to attempt to get my intellectual property back, so I saved the money I had planed on putting towards the patent, unfortunately now I need to get in contact with heads of gaming companies who probably get bombarded daily with ideas or attempt to start my own company and hire people. For the second option I'd need someone bankrolling the whole thing as I don't have the money to hire and sustain staff while developing the game. All I will is, is that the game intends to be a hybrid, giving the player a lot of freedom in what they want to do in this world I plan to create. I know that is not much to go on but if it is ever picked up by a company and the idea secured I'd be more than happy to go into extreme detail about what I would like my game to be. Thanks for your interest.

sorry it doesn't really answer your question,

-Azsouth/Anoden

​Yeah any investors will want proof of concept.  Did not understand you were still in the idea phase.  Really if you could partner with a programmer it would help you out.  Simply pay him for creating the proof of concept.  All you would need would be a robust PC and a game engine.  Unity3D, Unreal Engine, etc.  Obviously you could also learn how to work with those engine on your own, but be prepared for many hours of work if you aren't a programmer.  There are games that are going to be released for PC where the company was 2 guys until their proof of concepts was seen.

You've already seen what goes on behind the scenes at game companies.  It's a lot of work but in the end your product doesn't suffer because the game company decided to remove raiding or ignore PVP!

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​I spoke to a lawyer, you need an actual product which is beyond my capabilities, so I need to shop my game idea around to companies I think can make it with any degree of success, the lawyer to his credit was actually sad because he saw the prospectus I had wrote and thought it would be a great game apparently you can't patent ideas. Which means I have to be very careful with what I say about it because it's still not protected, in fact when shopping it to companies I need them to sign non-disclosure agreements so that way if they decide they don't like me but they like my idea and attempt to steal it I can sue them or at least have some legal recourse to attempt to get my intellectual property back, so I saved the money I had planed on putting towards the patent, unfortunately now I need to get in contact with heads of gaming companies who probably get bombarded daily with ideas or attempt to start my own company and hire people. For the second option I'd need someone bankrolling the whole thing as I don't have the money to hire and sustain staff while developing the game. All I will is, is that the game intends to be a hybrid, giving the player a lot of freedom in what they want to do in this world I plan to create. I know that is not much to go on but if it is ever picked up by a company and the idea secured I'd be more than happy to go into extreme detail about what I would like my game to be. Thanks for your interest.

sorry it doesn't really answer your question,

-Azsouth/Anoden

​So why were you bothering to work at a game development company? Did you even have any skills that they could use? Programming? 3d modelling? Animation? Or just that you played their game a lot and you thought that they cared about your input? You really should've gotten the hint the second time they asked you why you threw so much time into the part of the game they implemented as a passing thought.

Oh no wait, you had a game idea. Newsflash: every development company has a lot of great game ideas. I bet the overwhelming majority of them never passes through the conceptual phase. Because they cost millions of dollars & so many thousands of man-hours to make.

Still think that it'll be the messiah of the gaming industry? Start your own company then. Bring millions of dollars.

 

Edited by Dakilven
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​So why were you bothering to work at a game development company? Did you even have any skills that they could use? Programming? 3d modelling? Animation? Or just that you played their game a lot and you thought that they cared about your input? You really should've gotten the hint the second time they asked you why you threw so much time into the part of the game they implemented as a passing thought.

Oh no wait, you had a game idea. Newsflash: every development company has a lot of great game ideas. I bet the overwhelming majority of them never passes through the conceptual phase. Because they cost millions of dollars & so many thousands of man-hours to make.

Still think that it'll be the messiah of the gaming industry? Start your own company then. Bring millions of dollars.

 

​There's no reason to discourage him because he had an idea.  Lots of good ideas are being made into games right now with very little start up money.   You do realize Steve Jobs was an idea man.  (As much as I hate him and he stole ideas from others)  David Sears and another person started H-Hour a third person shooter in a garage with almost zero start up.  They used crowd funding from gamers to start up, just by presenting their ideas to players.  That game is in the beta with a PC version and PS4 port on the way. 

And game companies hire players all the time.  Especially as a QA tester.  They also hire other positions like sales, marketing, management, etc where having knowledge of a programming language is not a requirement.  What they do want to see a Bachelors Degree.  I have been in various sales management positions for over 15 years, yet Turbine would not even look at my resume because you guessed it, did not finish college.  Besides isn't the job of QA tester to player the game and report feedback on it.  Shit I did that for 5 years playing Lotro.  Played their game and then told them what they f'd up on their forums.

Just think with a degree I could have been getting paid for it!

 

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​There's no reason to discourage him because he had an idea.  Lots of good ideas are being made into games right now with very little start up money.   You do realize Steve Jobs was an idea man.  (As much as I hate him and he stole ideas from others)  David Sears and another person started H-Hour a third person shooter in a garage with almost zero start up.  They used crowd funding from gamers to start up, just by presenting their ideas to players.  That game is in the beta with a PC version and PS4 port on the way. 

And game companies hire players all the time.  Especially as a QA tester.  They also hire other positions like sales, marketing, management, etc where having knowledge of a programming language is not a requirement.  What they do want to see a Bachelors Degree.  I have been in various sales management positions for over 15 years, yet Turbine would not even look at my resume because you guessed it, did not finish college.  Besides isn't the job of QA tester to player the game and report feedback on it.  Shit I did that for 5 years playing Lotro.  Played their game and then told them what they f'd up on their forums.

Just think with a degree I could have been getting paid for it!

 

​Steve Jobs had a pocket genius that was capable of creating whatever he told him to. He had an idea, but it was a bit different than a video game.

If we all had our own pocket geniuses I'd be king of the world.

And yes, that second bit is true. Blizzard hired diehard fans from Everquest to help them design the most successful MMO of all time. However, you only have to spend an hour in PvP to know what type of company Turbine is. Why anyone would think Turbine would do anything as logical as actually taking ideas from players (PC is bullshit) makes me call into question how smart this Azsouth guy is. Especially if he actually went to their office. I don't know if Turbine has ever hired employees mostly because of their devotion to their games but it's obvious the higherups in that company just didnt give a fuck about the PvP. I'd be amused too if I was running a game company and some dude put on his resume that he spent thousands of hours on the most neglected part of my videogame.

Anyway I'm pretty sure established game devs are bombarded daily with 'super seecrit do not steal' game ideas. Turning your idea into reality by yourself is very possible, but seeing that he doesn't know what RAM is I doubt he has the capability.

 

Edited by Dakilven
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​ Blizzard hired diehard fans from Everquest to help them design the most successful MMO of all time.

 

​Also Ultima online.  Evocare was the lead designer on UO some of the expansions for that game and went on to design much of the item design and pvp system for WoW.

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​Steve Jobs had a pocket genius that was capable of creating whatever he told him to. He had an idea, but it was a bit different than a video game.

If we all had our own pocket geniuses I'd be king of the world.

And yes, that second bit is true. Blizzard hired diehard fans from Everquest to help them design the most successful MMO of all time. However, you only have to spend an hour in PvP to know what type of company Turbine is. Why anyone would think Turbine would do anything as logical as actually taking ideas from players (PC is bullshit) makes me call into question how smart this Azsouth guy is. Especially if he actually went to their office. I don't know if Turbine has ever hired employees mostly because of their devotion to their games but it's obvious the higherups in that company just didnt give a fuck about the PvP. I'd be amused too if I was running a game company and some dude put on his resume that he spent thousands of hours on the most neglected part of my videogame.

Anyway I'm pretty sure established game devs are bombarded daily with 'super seecrit do not steal' game ideas. Turning your idea into reality by yourself is very possible, but seeing that he doesn't know what RAM is I doubt he has the capability.

 

​I was just saying anything is possible.   People didn't think a new isometric fantasy RPG could be popular enough to garner interest in today's market.  Meanwhile Pillars Of Eternity made over 4 million dollars in crowd funding, before they even had a finished product.  And it's an excellent game. Divinity Original Sin was also partially crowd funded.  Both are doing well I know Divinity has sold over 500k copies.  Both games are scoring over 8's with players and critics.

On the pocket genius, I did suggest that he find a programmer to team with and get a proof of concept. No one buys a simple idea.

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Not knowing the kind of game being proposed makes proffering advice difficult.  If one is talking about something grand and labor intensive, the best that could be suggested is: land a starting position at a company, eventually work up to senior developer, assemble a credible body of work under your belt, and then start shopping the idea.  And be prepared to have 20 chefs stirring around in your pot and be prepared to make a lot of sacrifices for the sake of feasibility.  This course isn't necessarily the most attractive but it is the most (potentially) realistic.  We are of course talking about years of effort and all that goes with the industry lifestyle, including relatively frequent moves and general job insecurity.  But one certainly needs the credibility of industry experience to have check books opened to their idea, however inspired it may be.  To this end my advice (to anyone interested in landing a spot at a company) is to do one's homework.  If one wants a QA spot (not a bad place to start strategically) then study the science of QA, from basic concepts like white vs black box testing to STR writing to an understanding of programs like Test Track Pro, Bugzilla, JIRA, and so on.  Having more to your credit then 'I love games' can be a big advantage.  Once you are in the door put on your political hat and make friends: the importance of personal connections in the industry cannot be understated.

If the idea is more modest then it may be possible (as others have suggested) to bring on board others with the requisite skills and have a go at putting it out independently.  This has its own sorts of pitfalls (perhaps 4 out of 5 such attempts fizzle from design disagreements, team members drifting away, lack of the necessary free time , etc.).  If nothing else you will hopefully acquire some basic experience that could be of some value later.  Or, if practicable, develop a mod based on an existing title that approximates your vision.  

Whatever the case may be, one needs more than just a good game idea to see that idea become reality.  The truth is that in 99% of cases you can no more sell a game design off the street then you could walk into the Pentagon with a plan to restructure the Marine Corps.  At best you'll be politely thanked before the door is slammed in your face.  At worst they'll slam the door in your face and then file away your idea for their own future consideration. 

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Not really sure what I did to piss this guy off but I have a BA in History, I'm not really a people person (in fact I'm restraining myself from going into full on troll mode over these unprovoked attacks against me because I mentioned that some day I'd like to get into the gaming business, that I have an idea, and answered a question, in fact I bet Stickeez is waiting for me to blow my top :P), as I said in my first post I should have realized after the first question I was there as a token but I was hopeful they would have a spot for me in the company as I felt at the time they where trying to build a better relationship with those that play their game. The job was to test bugs and report them to the higher ups, not sure that a college degree or knowing how to code is required for that but then again I wasn't hired as stated. No I have no coding skills, I do in my spare time try to learn Python because I like Mount and Blade: Warband and have made my own sub-mod for Crusader Kings II neither of which have anything to do w/ LOTRO.

as stated I'm not a people person, so romancing people into opening their check books doesn't appeal to me, unfortunately that is where I'm at and I have to choose carefully in hopes those people don't steal the idea/change it a bit and call it theirs. if my game is developed I want it to be very high quality, if I wanted to I'm sure I could go down to RISD and grab a bunch of random people to see if they would like to test their skills, but I'd rather have it developed by people who know what they are doing and I would preferably like to keep the team small (again going for quality of worker over quantity). If I am to make a business which at this point seems less of an option than shopping the idea around I'd like it to be like what turbine was back in SoA as Aylwen described it was like a family and I'd prefer to keep it that way for as long as the game runs it's course or I develop a new one (I have several idea's, this one I'm talking about just excites me the most). I figure if the game is ever developed my role will be to oversee development and come up with solutions to problems that the people who do know how to build the game might be able to implement, and along the way maybe they (the game building literate employees) will teach me a few things so I'm not totally useless. I'm 99% convinced something like my idea isn't being developed atm nor am I sure if it can be given the current technology and different factors, anyone willing to take a shot at it will definitely be a brain teaser. But as the the guy assumes I'm sure getting an audience w/ people who are bombarded daily with ideas is as big a problem as we both think it is. Also, the person I am mainly addressing here is apparently illiterate as I mentioned I build computers, I know what RAM is I just never committed the actual name of the damn thing to memory and it was an example of what was on the test they gave at the end of the interview. I jumped into building computers cold, just taking my old one apart and rebuilding it and have since only gone about buying parts at either Newegg or TigerDirect, again using RAM in the search rather than Random Access Memory.

Anyway, the main reason I came to this forum was to share my experience w/ Turbine, I thought Aylwen may have been there when I went for the job, that question has been answered so I'm content with just reading the rest of this thread now rather than being attack for really no reason. If you really are interested in my game I'll answer what I can in PM's (apparently if you are a programmer I'd be more than happy to talk with you :)) or you can add/contact me on steam (which I'm on all the time) at http://steamcommunity.com/id/Rohan750 if you would like to talk w/ me further.  As far as I'm concerned though this thread was initially about pvpers in LOTRO it's now Aylwen's thread and really I'm only interested in seeing what he has to say, even if it's just random good time from around the office. I am one of those players that look back at SoA as the best time in the game so seeing under the hood of turbine and being reminded of what that time was like is nice.

./wave Stickeez

Best Regards,

-Azsouth/Anoden

EDIT: also let me make one last thing clear, I never put in my resume that I played x game for thousands of hours, to get the Turbine interview I submitted my resume with a cover letter, and anyone who knows anything about trying to get a job knows that a cover letter is personalized to the company you are applying to, so I mentioned in it that at the time I had a rank 14 warg. I as well would be amused if someone gave me a resume that said "I played your game for thousands of hours", alas cover letters are not resumes, something you either missed, don't understand, or intentionally left out to again belittle and attack me for from where I'm sitting, no reason at all :/.

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@ Azsouth 

entering any for profit industry is going to be a challenge absent some kind of wedge or a long slog from the bottom.  As Aylwen stated, networking with other people is going to be your best bet.   The simple fact is that in pretty much any industry having an idea is less challenging than bringing it to market once that industry is "big business".  And rarely can one person do it all.  This is neither good nor bad, it simply is.  Organizations like Turbine or Netdevil or egosoft ect. didn't get into trouble because their initial ideas/concepts were bad.  The business/management  side of the house is every bit as critical as the concept and programming side if you wish to avoid their problems. 

 

I also advise garnering different viewpoints/worldviews as it's more likely spitball sessions result in workable ideas instead of echo chambers.  An openness to differing viewpoints during design/planning is much more likely in keeping "issues" from becoming ISSUES .  Better your own people shoot holes in your ideas than the enemy.  Giving you the chance to address issues before they get set free in the wild.

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These walls o' text are painful. Azsouth, if you want even a hope in hell of being taken seriously by a company, you'll need to work on your writing abilities. Specifically, your paragraphs, punctuation, and grammar. Spelling seems fine.

However, as far as I can tell, you've got it into your head that you can just give an idea for a game and then just become the ideas guy for a successful games company because of it. Unfortunately, it doesn't work like that. As others have said, if it did work like that then we'd all be in that position already. You'll need to actually learn how to code for games, build up your rep (usually involves selling a successful indie game or two), actually make a demo of the game yourself to show it's possible, and get some chances to exhibit it to people in positions to make decisions on development of games. Just coming off the street and looking to hand a NDA over to just state your idea isn't going to cut it, if they give you the time of day to begin with. Especially when the game sounds no more than an open-world game (of which there are many already).

Note: if this isn't already news to you, I'm sorry. I couldn't actually read much of your posts because of the layout.

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 rather than being attack for really no reason.

​If you believe the advice being given so far to be an attack then you need to grow a thicker skin. Advice or criticism is often useful and you shouldn't just get defensive about it. I wish you luck, but as has already been mentioned, is seems very unlikely to me that you will be able to just go to an established developer or producer with an idea and suddenly become lead designer on a new game. You are either going to have to invest and put a team and the idea together yourself (like many indie devs do often). Or work your way up from the bottom of the pile in the industry until you are in a position to pitch your idea.

As I said, I wish you luck.

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These walls o' text are painful. Azsouth, if you want even a hope in hell of being taken seriously by a company, you'll need to work on your writing abilities. Specifically, your paragraphs, punctuation, and grammar. Spelling seems fine.

​^^^^THIS

I haven't even read any of your post, Azsouth, because of the way they are constructed, someone with a BA in history has had to have written a lot I assume. When you write a paper are they in the same format?

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All I could discern is that a BA in history tried to get into the gaming industry with nothing except for his magical idea for a game.

 

But be careful guys, he's about to go full-on troll mode.

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Azsouth,

The treatment you're getting here is kids' play compared to the stuff you'll face down the road if you continue with this endeavor. I'd suggest you take a long hard look at how you take in comments and personalize them.  This idea is obviously important to you and if you are going to extend yourself, put yourself and your idea out there, you need to be ready to endure a ton of rejection and ridicule.  Thank everyone, even the folks who consider 'you suck!' to be constructive criticism, for their feedback.

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Babby's first troll doesn't concern us. We are legion.

​Haha, Doro.

So might a child threaten a mailclad knight with a bow of string and green willow! -Imrahil

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