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Windows 10 free to pirated 7 users?


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Having read a little more, I suspect that the integration of the Windows store for apps is the reason for the free upgrade. With Windows 10 being a multi-platform software, covering phones, tablets, laptops, desktops and even X-Box, having as many devices connected will increase the number of apps available, one of the biggest issues on Windows Phones, and Microsoft will make their money via app sales.

So giving everyone the free OS would be a smart way to make lots more money as people love apps

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What's Microsoft planning on doing to screw everyone over?

 

 

I will be honest this made me laugh because I had a similar thought too. Rarely is something really "free" in the corporate world. I would imagine that anyone who is a pirate windows user and is considering this will be thinking the same thing. 

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No tinfoil hat here androclese, i'm not speculating nor am I concerned. I said it peaked my interest and it has. You are more than likely right, but it still remains to be seen how that will impact Windows in the future. 

 

edited because I wrote the wrong person's name lol

 

I think the tinfoil hat was for himself :P

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Http://www.theverge.com/2015/3/16/8227847/how-microsoft-makes-money

The statement about OneNote makes complete sense. Since I have Surface tablets and follow the SP3 model despite not having one, the number of people who used it on SP2 vs 3 is very different. The hardware and software integration for that application is much more polished on SP3 and everyone swears by OneNote as the best note-taking system in existence. Much like the Surface RT and 2 devices have free MS Office, the "killer app" approach seems to work for this ecosystem approach, huh.

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Microsoft has just announced the first pricing information for Windows 10 at its preview event today. The biggest news is that the new OS will be completely free for current Windows 8.1 and Windows 7 users for its first year of availability—after that time period has expired, OS upgrades will need to be paid for as they are currently. The Windows 10 upgrade for Windows Phone 8.1 users will also be free.

This is the from the first thread, emphasis mine, this looks like the whole turbine IC will be free and then it's not fiasco. Don't blame me because Microsoft can't write a clear and factual press release.

 

 

Quote


once a qualified Windows device is upgraded to Windows 10, we will continue to keep it up to date for the supported lifetime of the device, keeping it more secure, and introducing new features and functionality over time – for no additional charge

......but does the lifetime of the system mean the same to us as it does Microsoft? What if the HDD fails, can I reinstall Win 10 free? Or, I know this never happens ;), Win 10 becomes corrupted, still free?

 

And guess what XP still works fine, no updates, oh well, no Wednesday morning surprises after a Windows update either. And 7 will be around until the US Federal government adopts another OS.

 

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"Emphasis yours," ...OS upgrades will need to be paid for as they are currently. So here's a question I'll word simply for you, since you find their announcement horribly confusing and Turbine-like: Are current Windows upgrades subscription only after the first year?

Edit:

Oh, here's some new news about the piracy thing.

The consumer free upgrade offer for Windows 10 applies to qualified new and existing devices running Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows Phone 8.1. Some editions are excluded from the consumer free upgrade—including Windows 7 Enterprise, Windows 8/8.1 Enterprise, and Windows RT/RT 8.1. Active Software Assurance customers in volume licensing have the benefit to upgrade to other Windows 10 enterprise offerings.

We have always been committed to ensuring that customers have the best Windows experience possible. With Windows 10, although non-Genuine PCs may be able to upgrade to Windows 10, the upgrade will not change the genuine state of the license. Non-Genuine Windows is not published by Microsoft. It is not properly licensed, or supported by Microsoft or a trusted partner. If a device was considered non-genuine or mislicensed prior to the upgrade, that device will continue to be considered non-genuine or mislicensed after the upgrade. According to industry experts, use of pirated software, including Non-Genuine Windows, results in a higher risk of malware, fraud (identity theft, credit card theft, etc), public exposure of your personal information, and a higher risk for poor performance or feature malfunctions.

So it's not like getting a free Win10 upgrade on a pirated Win7/8 will somehow make your system legit. But no one knows what MS is planning for that.

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"Emphasis yours," ...OS upgrades will need to be paid for as they are currently. So here's a question I'll word simply for you, since you find their announcement horribly confusing and Turbine-like: Are current Windows upgrades subscription only after the first year?

 

Hmmm, good point....I still don't trust them!!! 7(8)7

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With Windows 10, although non-Genuine PCs may be able to upgrade to Windows 10, the upgrade will not change the genuine state of the license. Non-Genuine Windows is not published by Microsoft. It is not properly licensed, or supported by Microsoft or a trusted partner.

 

So it's all bullshit. You will go from a pirated copy ("non-genuine") of Win 7 to a Non-genuine, pirated copy of Win 10. This is completely different from giving all people a full copy of Win 10. You still have to buy the licence for Win 10 or Win 7 and get the upgrade. Or just keep using a pirated, non-validated copy.

 

According to this page (http://blog.chron.com/helpline/2011/06/what-does-it-mean-when-windows-tells-me-it-is-not-genuine/) with a non-genuine version " You will not be able to download patches and updates to the software.".  This seems correct, since MS itself says you will not be able to get any updates on this screenshot of Windows here.

 

If this is true all you are getting is a non-validated copy of Win 10 that will not download any updates (including any security updates). SO I ask you, how good is a copy of Win 10 than has no updates, and has not had any of the security fixes?

 

It seems like people thought you could go from a pirated copy of Win 7 to a legit copy of Win 10 - which does not seem to be the case. Seems like a lot of people thinking this were wrong.

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More info (you will get some critical updates):

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/help/genuine/faq   (click on Q. 5)

Regardless of genuine status, you'll still be able to get critical security updates. However, if your copy of Windows isn't genuine, you won't be able to install many updates that are exclusively for genuine Windows customers, including Microsoft Security Essentials. 

 

So the idea of getting Win 10 for free was wrong. You get an unlicensed, non-genuine copy of Win 10.

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So the idea of getting Win 10 for free was wrong. You get an unlicensed, non-genuine copy of Win 10.

No, the software is still gotten free, exactly like the previous pirated copy was "free." Don't you people understand how torrenting works? You torrent something illegally for "free" and install it, cracked and unlicensed, but you still got it "free." That's the whole idea. Basically nothing has changed except the mode of initial procurement (through MS), so that in itself is something quite different. But that doesn't shed any light on why this process would help MS.

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No, the software is still gotten free, exactly like the previous pirated copy was "free." Don't you people understand how torrenting works? You torrent something illegally for "free" and install it, cracked and unlicensed, but you still got it "free." That's the whole idea. Basically nothing has changed except the mode of initial procurement (through MS), so that in itself is something quite different. But that doesn't shed any light on why this process would help MS.

"If people pirate, they better pirate our software"

 

Reason might be to keep people in Windows ecosystem.

 

On one hand MS want people to use Windows on tablets and smartphones.

 

On the other hand Google is entering laptop market with ChromeOS.

 

There is always Apple, which cannot be underestimated especially on USA market where it's most popular.

 

Then there is Valve with SteamOS/Linux.

 

Other companies or even goverments still pouring some money into "Linux as alternative" in background.

 

And ongoing ARM vs x86 war.

 

Not to mention many companies investing in background large amounts of money into apllication/computing/gaming streaming to your device.

 

 

Microsoft propably want to keep and convince as many users around the world to keep using Windows ecosystem.

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When Windows XP support expired a few years back a client of mine was faced with an expensive task of upgrading all of there PC operating systems and in many cases the hardware. It would have cost an absolute fortune. What we helped them do instead was to set up a linux based thin client arrangement that ran all of their LOB software and we only needed to upgrade the back office staff that still needed to use Office. The existing hardware on the majority of their PCs was more than enough to run the thin client.

 

It saved them a fortune but it also now means that this client is no longer buying products developed by Microsoft for Windows or those products developed by companies specialising in Windows software. This wasn't the only company I know that did something similar. Microsoft make a lot of money off of Microsoft developers through licensing etc... as well as obviously making money off of it's own Windows only products. If businesses keep moving away from Windows every time a version goes out of support because the upgrade cost is too high, not only do Microsoft lose out on revenue from Windows sales but also from sales of Windows only software and from developers moving to other platforms. Free Windows upgrades was inevitable and makes a lot of sense for Microsoft in the long term.

 

Also with the new integrated Windows apps store, well the more people who visit your shop the better.

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This version should be better than Win8 and Vista, as the two groups doing the software have different levels of ability. It's easy to notice based on the history of the OS releases.

 

Free is good, just what's the support for the hardware? I may be paranoid, but something tells me there's a catch, like having to pay for drivers or something.

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Microsoft propably want to keep and convince as many users around the world to keep using Windows ecosystem.

Yes, this is going towards the Apple business model versus Google, and to be honest, I'd rather MS go towards more closed proprietary unification than Google's business model of selling their customers for advertising revenue. Oh well.

@Laurinaohtar

Were those smaller businesses? The businesses I've worked for have been quite large, and hardware/software costs were usually mitigated by corporate discounts or other deals I didn't know about (besides just having tons of money), while calculated training costs to switch systems entirely would rise exponentially given the global size. They had been locked in pretty early to Windows because so many enterprise applications required Win, besides everyone needing Office.

I don't necessarily see the overall approach as inevitable in relation to specific business reaction but rather as a strategic long-term plan that's closely bound to their new hardware projections (maybe it's both, if MS lost noticeable revenue in the corporate sector in the past few years). Though the first and second generations of their Surface tablets weren't that hot, they provided the template for innovation to their OEMs to compete against Apple, and that's a really big deal. But the OS and other MS software like Office had to follow suit to touch UI, which means moving more towards the "Metro" app ecosystem with WinRT APIs. Making things easier for app developers is the universal language that evolves Windows Phone with Windows RT into Windows 10 Mobile, and Continuum. Quite the impressive multi-prong approach, really.

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Yes, this is going towards the Apple business model versus Google, and to be honest, I'd rather MS go towards more closed proprietary unification than Google's business model of selling their customers for advertising revenue. Oh well.

@Laurinaohtar

Were those smaller businesses? The businesses I've worked for have been quite large, and hardware/software costs were usually mitigated by corporate discounts or other deals I didn't know about (besides just having tons of money), while calculated training costs to switch systems entirely would rise exponentially given the global size. They had been locked in pretty early to Windows because so many enterprise applications required Win, besides everyone needing Office.

I don't necessarily see the overall approach as inevitable in relation to specific business reaction but rather as a strategic long-term plan that's closely bound to their new hardware projections (maybe it's both, if MS lost noticeable revenue in the corporate sector in the past few years). Though the first and second generations of their Surface tablets weren't that hot, they provided the template for innovation to their OEMs to compete against Apple, and that's a really big deal. But the OS and other MS software like Office had to follow suit to touch UI, which means moving more towards the "Metro" app ecosystem with WinRT APIs. Making things easier for app developers is the universal language that evolves Windows Phone with Windows RT into Windows 10 Mobile, and Continuum. Quite the impressive multi-prong approach, really.

Yes, relatively small, where the cost of upgrading about 200 pcs (a call centre) would have been quite a hit to them. The actual software needed to run on these systems was just their own bespoke CRM systems which didn't need Windows to run.

Making things easier for app developers does make a lot of sense. From my own point of view as a developer of line of business software we are seeing a lot less demand for desktop only systems now (to be honest it's not a recent thing, it's been like it for a few years), instead clients are asking for browsercloud based systems usually with some interface for mobiletablets, I generally recommend Android to clients as for me developing for Android is a lot less hassle. The need for spending lots of money on Microsoft products such as Visual Studio and MSDN licenses isn't as great, if I were to ditch .Net development altogether I'm not sure anyone would shed a tear. If not every device I develop a piece of software for will be a Microsoft device, and they frequently are not, then I'm not going to be looking at WCFSharpointWinformsWPFASP etc... instead I will be looking at JavaHTML5.

As we start developing more n-device applications instead of single device ones, having more people using Windows platforms including phones, tablets and desktops, makes a lot of sense (for Microsoft). Offering free upgrades is a way to encourage more people and developers to look at, use and work (exclusively) on your OSs.

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This version should be better than Win8 and Vista, as the two groups doing the software have different levels of ability. It's easy to notice based on the history of the OS releases.

 

Free is good, just what's the support for the hardware? I may be paranoid, but something tells me there's a catch, like having to pay for drivers or something.

There wont be any cost for drivers. They want people to use Windows 10 and the Windows Store to buy apps, as this is where they will make their money. Right now the Windows Store doesnt have the same level of apps as Google Play or App Store, and this is hurting Micrsoft on the mobile market. With all of Mircosoft products sharing the same software the number of potential users for the apps goes up massively and will give a good incentive to app makers to make a Windows version. This in turn should help the mobile platform that has struggled in the past year.

Also with all devices using the same OS, it should give more inter connectivity between them, again making them more attractive to users. A good example of this would be Cortana, which you can currently get on Windows Phones. The more you use Cortana the more it understands about you and tries to tailor the information it provides you. It also gets to know who your friends and family are and can provide reminders about them for you. It can even set it to send a text when your phone rings if you are unable to answer it, eg you are in a meeting. Now all that info will automatically sync with your PC and Tablet and each time you update it on one it updates on all of them.

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