Jump to content
LOTROCommunity

The Stone of Erech


Belechannas
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have been running all my alts that had been stuck at 65/Mirkwood through the epic to get them up to the start of ROI.  That means mainly (ugh) the Enedwaith part of the epic.

I've done the extremely long and tedious session play with Isildur, which starts and ends at the Stone of Erech twice, and I have to do it twice more.

Most of Tolkien's writings were entirely believable and plausible (within the framework of a fantasy world, of course) - that's what makes them so great.  But it occurred to me that the Stone of Erech makes absolutely no sense at all.

The story is that Elendil and his sons were members of the royal family on the outs with the current (illegitimate) king, who hated elves and was being played by Sauron. When it's clear that the king is about to doom the entire island kingdom to certain destruction, Elendil and his followers leave at the last possible minute - in ships - and sail to Middle Earth.

So, if you are a political refugee, and leaving the island where you and your family have always lived, and you can only take with you whatever you can pack into a relatively small number of ships to start anew (remember the evil king was using practically every ship in the kingdom for his foolish evil plan), does it make any sense that you would use a huge amount of limited cargo capacity for... a huge slab of black rock that has no practical use whatsoever?

And then once you reach your new home, and create a new kingdom, you take this huge rock out of the ship, and drag it approximately 200 km inland, to the top of a hill in the most remote part of your new kingdom, and leave it there in the middle of nowhere?

The only possible explanation is that Isildur was a complete and utter retard, which I guess is consistent with cutting the ring off Sauron's hand and then NOT throwing it into the fire that's within walking distance because...oh, look - shiny!

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been running all my alts that had been stuck at 65/Mirkwood through the epic to get them up to the start of ROI.  That means mainly (ugh) the Enedwaith part of the epic.

I've done the extremely long and tedious session play with Isildur, which starts and ends at the Stone of Erech twice, and I have to do it twice more.

Most of Tolkien's writings were entirely believable and plausible (within the framework of a fantasy world, of course) - that's what makes them so great.  But it occurred to me that the Stone of Erech makes absolutely no sense at all.

The story is that Elendil and his sons were members of the royal family on the outs with the current (illegitimate) king, who hated elves and was being played by Sauron. When it's clear that the king is about to doom the entire island kingdom to certain destruction, Elendil and his followers leave at the last possible minute - in ships - and sail to Middle Earth.

So, if you are a political refugee, and leaving the island where you and your family have always lived, and you can only take with you whatever you can pack into a relatively small number of ships to start anew (remember the evil king was using practically every ship in the kingdom for his foolish evil plan), does it make any sense that you would use a huge amount of limited cargo capacity for... a huge slab of black rock that has no practical use whatsoever?

And then once you reach your new home, and create a new kingdom, you take this huge rock out of the ship, and drag it approximately 200 km inland, to the top of a hill in the most remote part of your new kingdom, and leave it there in the middle of nowhere?

The only possible explanation is that Isildur was a complete and utter retard, which I guess is consistent with cutting the ring off Sauron's hand and then NOT throwing it into the fire that's within walking distance because...oh, look - shiny!

 

Hehe... they also took a white tree with them that they seemed to place a LOT of value in... good thing it didn't produce light for Feanor to tinker with. :P

Oh no! White tree is dying! Gondor is DOOMED!!!

Aragorn has found a white tree sapling! Hurrah! Make him king!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, the tree had great significance as a connection to the Valar and the original heritage of Numenor.  I don't imagine a sapling took up a lot of cargo space, either.

But seriously, if you know the world is about to end, and you are taking the last ship off the island with only what it can carry, wouldn't you go "are you fucking mental?!" if some kid told you to stow a giant slab of rock onto the ship?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would imagine its the same sort of principle as the very real Stone Henge in southern England, that had many of its enormous stones transported from a small town in Wales named Maenclochog. That is an approximate 175 mile trip back when there was no easy way to transport them. It is believed that the stones were chosen from that location as the town's name is roughly translated as "Ringing Rock" and back in the bronze ages it was believed that resonating stones had healing principles. In that manner, I would imagine that Tolkien may have used a similar inspiration when writing about the Stone of Erech. Basically, it is not so much what it is but the belief of what it can do. In that sense, people will always find a way no matter how impossible a task seems.  

Edited by INTELLIGENCE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First of all, there are simply parts in Tolkiens works that are meant to not really make sense. Bombadil is another example of this.

I would suppose the Stone has some actually usefulness, e.g. being a symbol of the Valar and a way for Men to show allegiance/respect to Valinor. Perhaps bringing the stone is a reason they actually made it out of Numenor alive, by bringing the stone it's clear to Eru some Men value the Valar and should be spared. The Stone might also be Isildurs powerbase in terms of being able to bind others to their oaths and consequently curse them if they break said oath.

Placing it so far in land could be a means to preserve it. We don't know if it could be crushed by force, but by placing it so far in land they could be pretty sure noone would dig up the stone and throw it into the sea as they might do had it been closer to the sea or a river. The Downfall of Numenor also caused floods, so they knew the Valar/Eru were able to make some serious floods. Keeping the stone far away from the shore and on a hill they could be pretty sure the stone would survive any flood.

It could also just be another "See what we can do!" feat alongside all the massive wonders they accomplished in Middle Earth.

We don't know the weight of it either, as much as it's a stone it's possibly an overworldly object made by the Valar. If the stone is light enough, it might even be able to float and all they did was put it in a big net and tow it after one of the boats?

EDIT: http://forums.theonering.com/viewtopic.php?t=78611 also suggests the Stone of Erech was one of the things that changed a LOT over time and possibly never reached a "finished state" where the object itself actually makes sense.

 

Edited by Elrantiri
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a lot of shit like this in Tolkien's writings. Why introduce eagles and then not use them for the most important part? Why would Sauron, an extremely old being, be so stupid as to leave a volcano open? Why don't Orcs just dig their way into cities using the vast number of creatures at their disposal? Why would Gollum be waiting for the Fellowship in Moria? He leaves a lot of boo-boos in his writing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a lot of shit like this in Tolkien's writings. Why introduce eagles and then not use them for the most important part? Why would Sauron, an extremely old being, be so stupid as to leave a volcano open? Why don't Orcs just dig their way into cities using the vast number of creatures at their disposal? Why would Gollum be waiting for the Fellowship in Moria? He leaves a lot of boo-boos in his writing.

 

33-more-of-the-greatest-movie-punches-ever_j7nq.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Stone of Erech as portrayed in LotRO is much, much bigger than it should be.

erech.jpg

It's described as being 12 feet in diameter, half buried, so standing as tall a man. Not the behemoth in game.

The proportions of things have been adjusted by most (all?) of the people who have translated the words into a more visual element.  A great example is Minas Tirith, which as described in the books is a much more squat structure.  Peter Jackson made a great looking city out of it by making it much taller and narrow than described (and Turbine did likewise to a smaller degree).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Stone of Erech as portrayed in LotRO is much, much bigger than it should be.

erech.jpg

It's described as being 12 feet in diameter, half buried, so standing as tall a man. Not the behemoth in game.

True but I'd guess that's simply a size increase done to make it easier for the regular noob to see/find it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The proportions of things have been adjusted by most (all?) of the people who have translated the words into a more visual element.  A great example is Minas Tirith, which as described in the books is a much more squat structure.  Peter Jackson made a great looking city out of it by making it much taller and narrow than described (and Turbine did likewise to a smaller degree).

Yes that's true, but I was responding to the OP who was questioning the sanity of Isildur for bringing the rock to it's present location, presumably based on how big it is in the game. In the game it's enormous and, assuming it's igneous and solid, it would weigh 100's , or more likely 1000's of tonnes. You'd have to build something extraordinary to transport that.

As it's described elsewhere (12 feet in diameter) it would weigh about 70 tonnes. Still a pretty stupid thing to put on a ship and cart inland, but a bit more 'realistic'. But hey, fantasy. 

True but I'd guess that's simply a size increase done to make it easier for the regular noob to see/find it.

Yeah, I don't have a problem with it in the game.

Yet they seem to be having the opposite problem as of late. *Cough* Helm's Deep *Cough*

Bad-a-boom, ching!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yet they seem to be having the opposite problem as of late. *Cough* Helm's Deep *Cough*

Really? I thought myself that the size of HD was one of the things they got fairly right. I remember that I took out the book in HD beta to see, and the only thing I could see being wrong was the sewer thingy, no doubt because they needed to fit walking characters in there.

It's ugly as hell tho...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really? I thought myself that the size of HD was one of the things they got fairly right. I remember that I took out the book in HD beta to see, and the only thing I could see being wrong was the sewer thingy, no doubt because they needed to fit walking characters in there.

It's ugly as hell tho...

Yes.  Helms deep was a pretty good fit to the way it was described in the books.  However, some oddities came from allowing for players to interract - the top of the wall is a bit too wide (and the parapets are designed oddly) in an attempt to make the top of the wall better for navigation by players.  Likewise the drain culvert.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...